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The following are graves of Revolutionary War patriots in Madison County, Illinois, that have been marked by the General George Rogers Clark Chapter, SAR or the chapter participated in the ceremony.

Click here to read information compiled by chapter member Alan Y. Harrison about all
known Revolutionary War patriots buried in Madison County, Illinois;
click here for patriots buried in Macoupin Co.,
click here for patriots buried in Jersey Co.;
click here for patriots buried in Bond Co.;
click here for patriots buried in Fayette Co.;
click here for patriots buried in St. Clair Co.;
click here for patriots buried in Montgomery Co.;
and click here for patriots buried in Washington Co.


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GRAVE MARKING CEREMONY
NIX-JUDY PIONEER CEMETERY
Glen Carbon, Illinois
July 21, 2013
Nix Judy
The service of five Revolutionary War soldiers was honored during ceremonies.  They are:  sham Randle; his brother, Richard Randle; their brother-in-law, Josias Wright; and Henry Thornhill.
car
Members of the Col. Benjamin Stephenson Children of the American Revolution Society assisted with the marking.

DEDICATION OF HISTORIC MARKER
HONORING CAPTAIN JEAN BAPTISTE HAMELIN
Cahokia IL
July 4, 2013

posting colors
Captain Hamelin
Hamelin
(Top) Compatriot Eric Reelitz posts the colors inside the historic Holy Family Church. (Middle) Color guard members from GGRC, Lewis and Clark and Long Knives Chapters participated in the posting of the colors. (Bottom) Marker honoring Captain Jean Baptiste Hamelin and marking site of his home. During the American Revolution, Hamelin served in the Second Canadian Regiment of the Continental Army until he was recruited to serve with George Rogers Clark in Cahokia in 1779.  He fought and served the American cause from 1776 to 1780. The marking was sponsored by the Cahokia Mound DAR Chapter, Save Illinois History, the Illinois State Historical Society, and the Hamelin family.


Grave Marking Ceremony for Daughter of Revolutionary War Patriot
Mary Trotter Mills, daughter of James Trotter
  Wednesday, June 5, 2013
Old Campground Cemetery
Bond County, Illinois
Mary Trotter Mills marking
The Benjamin Mills DAR Chapter sponsored the grave marking for Mary Trotter Mills. The event also marked the chapter's 100th anniversary. Shown are some chapter members and descendants with GGRC members.


Grave Marking Ceremony for Revolutionary War Patriot Joseph Evans

  Saturday, May 11, 2013
Kirkland Cemetery
Montgomery County, Illinois
Joseph Evans
Personal Information:
   Born:  about 1752 in Virginia
   Family:  Married Mary, and had two children:  Joseph, Jr., and a daughter
   Died:  September 4, 1852

Military Record:  Private in Captain Joseph Crockett's Company, Colonel McClanahan's 7th Regiment of Virginia Militia and in Captain James Parr's Company in Colonel Morgan and Colonel Butler's regiments.

Narrative:  In 1818, Joseph Evans applied for a pension and was given $8.00 per month while living in Claiborne Co., TN.  He was dropped and reinstated under the act of March 1823 and transferred his pension at Vandalia, Illinois in 1830.  

Grave Marking Ceremony for Revolutionary War Patriot Peter Niswonger, and

 Clarissa Niswonger Robinett, his daughter
  Sunday, June 3, 2012
Robinett Family Cemetery
Leamington, Illinois
Color Guard
Color Guard members from Long Knives and GGRC chapter participated in the grave marking ceremony.





The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Robert Kidd
was marked at a Whiteside Station DAR Chapter ceremony
on June 19, 2011, near Fults IL.
A GGRC chapter member assisted in the ceremony.
Robert Kidd




The grave of Elizabeth Key Watts, wife of Revolutionary War patriot Benjamin Watts,
was marked at a Ninian Edwards DAR Chapter ceremony
on October 23, 2011, at the Verner-Watts Cemetery
Located in the Masonic Cemetery Nashville, Washington Co, IL.  
A member of the GGRC chapter served as color guard and is pictured with family members.


Watts




The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Jacob Grotts
was marked at a Ninian Edwards DAR Chapter ceremony
on November 7, 2010 at Palmer Cemetery, Monroe Co., IL
The GGRC provided a color guard
 (GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 463664; W 090 degrees 2156687)
Joseph Grotts

Personal Information:
   Born:  1754
   Family:  Married Mary Bull on December 17, 1776.  They had five children:  William, John, Mary, Jane, and                 Catherine
   Died September 1787 at Piggott's Fort, Monroe, Illinois

Military Record:  Jacob Grotts was a private in Captain George Owen's Company of Militia of the District of Clarksville, Jefferson Co., Virginia.  

Narrative:  The Grotts family was among the first group to own land in Illinois.  With the help of Bartolemi Tardiveru, forty-five families and some residual French families were granted land in an area that was to become Monroe and Randolph counties in 1791.  






The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Jacob Seagraves
was marked at a Ninian Edwards DAR Chapter ceremony
on October 30, 2010 at

the St. John's United Church of Christ Cemetery, Breese, Illinois.
The GGRC provided a color guard

Seagraves tombstone
Pvt Jacob Seagraves

Personal Information:
    Born: In 1763 in North Carolina
    Family: Son of Jacob and Patience Seagraves
    Married Priscilla Strickland
    Death: June 7, 1835, Clinton Co., IL

Military Record: In 1781, at the age of 18, he fought in the Battle of Eutaw Springs, S.C.  The Continental Forces were victorious and it was the last engagement against the British in the Carolinas.

Narrative:  Seagraves married Priscilla Strickland and they had seven children.  Priscilla died in 1804.  One year later, Seagraves married Elizabeth Hanes and they moved to Maury County, Tenn., where he applied for a pension.  

In 1828, Jacob Seagraves came to Clinton County Illinois where he acquired land two miles south of Breese and 1/4 mile east of Germantown Road.  He was instrumentral in the beginnings of St. John's United Church of Christ when it featured circuit riders and visiting ministers.  



The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Robert Stuart Coulter
was marked at a Ninian Edwards DAR Chapter ceremony
on July 17, 2010 at

the United Church of Christ Cemetery, Grantfork, Illinois.
The GGRC provided a color guard
 (GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 8331025; W 089 degrees 6700899)
pvt Robert Stuart Coulter
Pvt Robert Stuart Coulter (1760-1821)
Personal Information:
    Born: In 1760 in Winsboro, North Carolina
    Family: Son of Robert and Mary Stuart Coulter
    Married Margaret Fleming
    Death: September 4, 1821 in Madison Co.

Military Record: He served in the war as a drummer boy at the age of 14 and was a private at age 16 in the service of South Carolina. He served under Capt. John Turner, Col. Richard Winn in 1780-1782.

Burial: Unknown. He owned property in the Grantfork area.

Narrative: On July 29, 1817 he entered the second tract of land in Madison Co., one hundred sixty acres in Section 4, Saline Tp. which is present day Grantfork.  The Board of Commissioners of Madison Co. appointed Robert Coulter as a Trustee of the school-lands.

Sources:
    Books
        History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
        Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Patriots Buried In Madison County,                     Illinois, update by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
        News Democrat, Jan. 20, 1982, Revolutionary soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer.

    Internet
        Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note-Information from this site is subject to                             verification.

    Other: SC Arch. Accts. Aud., #1513-A Roll #26 – Stub entries to Idents issued in payment of Claims Against SC             growing out of the Revolution



The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Martin Pruitt
was marked at a Ninian Edwards DAR Chapter ceremony
on June 19, 2010 at

the Pruitt Cemetery, Bethalto, Illinois.
The GGRC provided a color guard
 (GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 53' 24"; W 090 degrees 1' 40.8")
Martin Pruitt
Martin  Pruitt (Preuitt) (1752-1844)
Personal Information:
    Born:  July 15, 1752 in Bontorte, Fincastle, Virginia

    Family:  Son of William and Mary Pruitt. He was one of nine children.
        Married Mary Woods in North Carolina in 1771

    Death:  June 22, 1844 in Edwardsville

Military Record:  Martin enlisted in the fall of 1778 for two years under Capts. William Campbell and William Edminton. William Edminton made Col. In 1780 Martin served as a sergeant and a spy. 

Burial:  Pruitt Cemetery in Bethalto. The cemetery is now located on the St. Louis Regional Airport. The Genl George Rogers Clark Chapter of the SAR honored him in 1993.

Narrative:  Several of the family was killed by Cherokee Indians in Tennessee in 1806 and in that same year the family moved to Madison County, Illinois. They first settled on Sand Ridge prairie, about three miles east of Alton. Later they moved to a farm which is about one-half mile south of the present-day Zion Lutheran Church in Bethalto. Martin and his wife left ten children.

Martin settled on a farm in Foster Tp. In1806. Two of his sons, James and Abraham, pursued and caught one of the Kickapoo Indians who killed Mrs. Reagan following the Wood River Massacre. When the Indian was cornered he tried to shoot one of the Pruitt boys, but his gun jammed just long enough for the other Pruitt boy to shoot the Indian. When the Indian’s shot pouch was removed from his dead body, Mrs. Reagan’s scalp was found inside. The gun is now on display at the Madison County Historical Museum in Edwardsville.

Sources:
    Books
        History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
        Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
            pages 341-343 (Biggs)
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912, page 372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51),                         60,63,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Census
    1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age

Pension  S32455VA

Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to verification)

Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison County         Court House Lobby, placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American Revolution on     September 16, 1912



Cornelison
John Cornelison (Carnelison) (abt. 1758 – Aft 1840)
Personal Information:
    Born: About 1758 probably in North Carolina

    Family:  Married Elizabth ______?____      and they had one son, John

    Death:  aft. 1840

Military Record:  He was a private in North Carolina. He enlisted in June 1778 and served in companies commanded by Capt. John Armstrong, Capt. Archibald Lytle, and Col. John McLean. He enlisted for four years in companies of  Capt.    Smith., Capt. Adolph Hedrick, Capt. Francis Cole, Capt. John Childs, and Capt. Jennings. He was in The battle of Stono.

Burial:  Unknown    He lived between Alton and Bethalto. 

Narrative:  After the war he moved to Fayette Co., KY, from there to Greene Co., IL, and then to Madison Co., IL. He was reported to be residing with Solomon Pruitt in 1840.

Sources:
    Books
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835 (Greene Co.)
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912,
        page 372-381)

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer
    Census
    1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age

    Pension  S35209 (NC)    He filed for a pension, which was allowed, while living in Kentucky, Pension Census,             June 1, 1840, Madison Co., age 82, residing with W.C. Johns, head of family.

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to verification)

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the                     Madison County Court House Lobby, placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of                     the American Revolution on September 16, 1912

The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Anthony Alexander Harrison
was marked at a Ninian Edwards DAR Chapter ceremony
on June 19, 2010 at
the Vaughn Hill Cemetery, Bethalto, Illinois.
The GGRC provided a color guard
(Off SR111.  GPS coordinates:  N38 degrees 52.501'; W090 degrees 03.460')
Harrison
Anthony Alexander Harrison (1763-1842)
Personal Information:
    Born:  March 18, 1763 in Westmorland Co., Virginia

    Family: Married Alice Nelson on June 25, 1793.
         Married Hannah Sanford July 16, 1793

    Death:  It is speculated that he died in the winter of 1842/1843.

Military Record: Before his eighteenth birthday Anthony entered service substituting for Thomas Mason at Greensville, VA for five months. His was commanded by Capt. John Lucas. He joined a company commanded by Capt Thomas Newsom as a six week substitute for James Walker. He fought at Petersburg and the British prevailed burning the town. General Mecklenburg was in overall command. He then volunteered in the Light Infantry Regiment commanded by Col. Alexander Dick in a company commended by his brother Capt. Joseph Harrison. He was stationed for six weeks at Malben Hills on the James River and was from there pursued by the British to Richmond and further through Goochland Co. where he was discharged after eight weeks. His total time in service was eight months and fifteen days.

Burial:  Unknown    Anthony’s son married Mary Vaughn and his land was just north of Vaughn, where McDonald’s Restaurant is located. Anthony’s farm was just west of Vaughn. 

Narrative: From William Sanford Sr. (Hannah’s father -?) he inherited 75 acres of land. He then moved to Orange Co., VA where he lived till 1814. He then moved to Somerset Tp., Pulaski Co., KY. He remained there until the early 1820’s (1821?) when he moved to Madison Co., IL with his rather large family (5 boys and 5 girls). Anthony was living in Greenfield Tp., Madison Co., when he made application for a pension for his Revolutionary War service.

Sources:
    Books
        Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912,
        page 372-381)
    Stalker 9, #3 page 116,117 (Article Anthony Harrison)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Buried In Madison County, Illinois,
        update by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74

    Census:  1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age

Pension  S32303 (VA): Madison County, Illinois pension Roll, April 9, 1834, age 71; Madison County Pension Census, June 1, 1840, age 77, residing with William L. Harrison, head of family.

Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this site is subject to verification)

Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison County
    Court House Lobby, placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American Revolution on
    September 16, 1912



The Genl George Rogers Clark chapter hosted a patriot commemoration ceremony
at Glenwood Cemetery, Collinsville, Illinois on June 5, 2010 in honor of
five Revolutionary War soldiers:  
Benjamin Johnson
John Long
Elihu Mather
Robert McMahon
Henry Rebis

(GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 40.028'; W 089 degrees 59.095)
5 patriots
Benjamin Johnson  (1758-1844)

Personal Information:
    Born:  June of 1758 in Orange Co., VA
   
    Death:  December 8, 1844 in Madison County

Military Record: He was a soldier from VA.

Burial:  Glenwood Cemetery – Collinsville, IL. The cemetery records acknowledge the burial of Benjamin Johnson but the location is not known. He owned land in the Collinsville Area.

Narrative:  He was living in Perry Co., Frankfort, IL when his pension was rejected having only served 5 months. Six months service was needed for a pension.  He was living with W.L. Harrison on the 1840 Madison County, Illinois Pension Census, age 82.

Sources:
    Books
        History of Madison County, Illinois 1882, page 455
        Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
        Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count,
        Oct 1912, page 372-381)
        Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Buried In Madison County, Illinois,
        update by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
        Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51),                     60,73,74

    Census
    1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age

    Other  Madison County Probate Case Files Index

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison     County Court House Lobby, placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American             Revolution on September 16, 1912

Only one soldier filed for a pension from Illinois. That application was filed in Perry Co., IL. The pension was denied for lack of the necessary time in service.

The pension application shows that Johnson was born in Kent, Maryland. The Johnson of Madison Co. was born in Orange Co., VA.

A connection between the VA Johnson and the Maryland Johnson cannot be made.      

The Johnson buried in Glenwood Cemetery was recognized as a Revolutionary War soldier. He was recognized as a Revolutionary soldier on the DAR plaque in the Madison Co. Courthouse.                       

Military Record: He was drafted in September or October 1777 according to the disposition of March 1833. He marched the Sassafras River to Germantown and missed the battle. He was in service 5 months (six months is required for a pension), thus his pension was denied 

Narrative: Information RE: the two Benjamin Johnsons has most confusing. We have accepted with the payroll records of VA that the Benjamin Johnson is qualified as a Revolutionary War Soldier Buried In Madison County, IL.

John Long (1732-1839)

Personal Information:
    Born:  1732 in Granville, NC

    Family:  Married Frances Estes in Caswell Co., NC

    Death:  February 10, 1839 in Madison Co., IL

Military Record:  He enlisted March 1, 1781, serving three months in Capt. James Pearce’s company; August 1 1781 for three months in Capt. Hargron  Searsay’s company, Col. Thomas Taylor’s Regiment. He was in the battle of Guilford Courthouse.

Burial:  He owned land in the Collinsville area and died there.  

Narrative:  John and his wife came to Madison County at an early day and prospered financially owning large tracts of land, and after the custom of those days they kept a hotel.

Sources:
    Books
        History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
        Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
        Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
        Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Illinois by Harriet Walker, 1967
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
        Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count,
        Oct 1912, page 372-381)
       
    Newspapers
        News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Pension  NC: R6429: Madison County, Illinois Pension Roll, April 23, 1833, age 71: Frances R6426 (NC), Frances,         widow of John, resident St. Clair County when pension was rejected (Act July &, 1838) Not a widow at                 date of the Act.”

    Other:  Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the         Madison County Court House Lobby, placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the                 American Revolution on September 16, 1912

Elihu Mather (d.1831)

Personal Information:
    Born:
    Family:
    Death: 

Military Record: Elihu enlisted at Windsor, CT into the Third Regiment under Col. Samuel Wyllys, in Capt. Daniel Allen’s company: he was a sergeant in the Fourth Regiment under Col. Zebulon Butler January 1, 1781.

Burial:  Elihu owned land in Collinsville and died there.

Narrative:  He came to Illinois at an early day, settling in Madison County, where he died and lies buried. – “Connecticut in the Revolution”

Sources:
    Books
        Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
        Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States, 1844-1845, Tuesday, December 17, 1844
        Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Buried In Madison County, Illinois,                 update by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
        Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51),                     60,73,74

    Pension  CTR4360

    Other:  Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the         Madison County Court House Lobby, placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the                 American Revolution on September 16, 1912

Robert McMahan (McMahon) Sr. (1759-1823)

Personal Information:
    Born:  1759 in Virginia

    Family:  Son of John McMahan and Debra Stockton
        1st Wife- Margaret Clark, 2nd wife-Nancy Kester

    Death:  November 26, 1823 or before in the Troy area of Madison County

Military Record: He served under Capt. Patterson’s company Augusta County, VA. According to the pension hearing he marched to Guilford Courthouse in NC where he was engaged in battle and taken prisoner. He left the service in 1781.

Burial:  Unknown.  He owned property in the Collinsville in the area. 

Narrative: Robert McMahon, esq (lawyer) migrated first to Lexington, KY where at Crab Orchard, KY he married 1st Margaret Clarke Cline on June 29, 1785 and later moved to New Design now Monroe Co., IL in 1793.His family was attacked by Indians January 26, 1795 and his wife and three children were scalped and killed. Robert and daughter, Sally were kidnapped by the Indians. They were marched north with Mr. McMahon carrying the goods  ransacked from his house. He managed to escape but forced to leave his daughter with the Indians. Chief Blackbird returned Sally according to the treaty of Greenville where all captives were to be returned to the white settlements. 

Robert married 2nd Nancy Kester in June in 1795 in St. Clair County, Il. Nancy applied for a pension on January 20, 1858 in Madison County, IL at age 80 as the widow of Robert McMahan. She stated that her husband died in Madison County, IL. Her pension was rejected. (Perhaps he did not have 6 months in service. One page of the pension hearing was illegible.

Sources:
    Books
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        History of Madison County, Illinois, 1882 pgs54,85,00,438, 7 455
        History of St. Clair County, Illinois pg F240
        Illustrated Historical Atlas of Randolph County, Illinois 1875
        Combined History of Randolph, Monroe, and Perry Counties, Illinois, 1883, pp67, 8821,331
        The History of Randolph County, Illinois, Including Old Kaskaskia Island by E.J. Montague, 1859, p43

    Census
    1818 State Census, Madison County
    1820 Madison County Federal Census – Ridge Prairie

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, 1912 Centennial Edition, p73,74

    Pension  R16357V

    Other 
        Illinois public Domain Land Tract Sales Database (online)
        Land Certificates (copies of the original framed documents at the     (MCHL)

    Internet  Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to             verification.

Henry Revis (Reavis)  (1752-1837)

Personal Information:
    Born:  August 11, 1752 in Northampton Co., North Carolina

    Family:  Son of Thomas and Ann Revis.
        His first wife is unknown. His second wife was Polly Biggerstaff.

    Death:  April 21, 1837 probably in the Maryville area.

Military Record:  In Surry Co., North Carolina he enlisted in the fall of 1775 for three months with Capt. Jacob Free; reenlisted for three months under the same officer; and again enlisted under Capt. William Neville, Col. Armstrong’s Regiment serving for one year.

Burial:  Unknown    The land owned by Henry Revis is now St. John’s Cemetery just south of Maryville on Rt. 159. He is not listed on any cemetery list.

Narrative:  He came to Illinois with his brother who settled in Montgomery Co., IL . He bought 160 acres in 1814 in present-day Maryville Area.

Sources:
    Books
        History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
        Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
        Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912,
        page 372-381)
        Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Buried In Madison County, Illinois,                 update by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
        Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section,
        page 3 (51), 60,73,74

    Pension  S32475NC : Madison County, Illinois Pension Roll, January 29. 1834, age 80

    Internet  Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to             verification.

    Other:  Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the         Madison County Court House Lobby, placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the                 American Revolution on September 16, 1912
 



The grave of Revolutionary War patriot William Gillham
was marked at a Ninian Edwards DAR Chapter ceremony
on May 22, 2010 at

the Newbern Cemetery, E. Newbern, Illinois.
The GGRC provided a color guard & a SAR marker.
(GPS Coordinates: Latitude 39.0075476, Longitude -90.3356691)
Wm Gillham
William Gilllham (c1750 - 27 Oct 1825)

William Gillham was the son of Thomas and Margaret "Peggy" Gay Campbell who lived in Calfpasture, Augusta Co., Virginia.  Thomas Gillham, born c.1710, came to America from County Ulster, Northern Ireland, land of the Scotch-Irish, about 1730 with his first wife Mary Meade and one child, Charles Gillham.  They had four children before she died.

Thomas Gillham married 1746-49 in Calfpasture, Augusta County, Virginia, his second wife, Margaret "Peggy" Gay Campbell, born in 1725 in Scotland, a member of the large and prominent Campbell family in the area.  General William Campbell of Revolutionary War fame was a cousin of her father.  Thomas and Margaret had seven children: Thomas, James, Isaac, Sarah "Sally", Susannah, William, and John.  Thomas Gillham was an active and vigorous man.  He is thought to have been a surveyor.  He qualified as Captain of Foot, August 20, 1752, during the French and Indian War.  In 1764, Thomas, Sr., secured a land grant from North Carolina Governor Tyron In Mecklenburg County.  The Gillhams then sold their land in Augusta County, Virginia.  There was a lengthy debate about state boundaries, and when the boundaries were finally settled, Thomas Gillham's land proved to be in what is now Union County, South Carolina.  Thomas, his sons, two of his daughter's husbands, and at least one grandchild served in the American troops during the Revolutionary War.  Both sons-in-law lost their lives in the War.  Thomas is believed to have died between 1789-1790 in York Co., South Carolina and his grave is in Bullock's Creek Cemetery.  Mary Meade died about 1740, and his second wife Margaret Campbell died in 1776.

William Campbell Gillham was the ninth child of Thomas Gillham, Sr., and the fifth by his second wife, Margaret Gay Campbell.  He married about 1782 in North Carolina to Jane McDow who was born about 1758 in South or North Carolina.  They had eight children:  John Davidson, William Jr., Ezekiel, Agnes, Sarah, Maregaret, Mary, and Jane.

William fought in the Revolutionary War and was a Sergeant in South Carolina Militia in Grandon's Regiment before and after the fall of Charleston.  In Stub Entries to Indents he was issued on the 27 September '85 for five pound fourteen and three pence for a horse & saddle & bridle lost in 1780.

Most of Thomas Gillham's children and grandchildren succumbed to the lure of western lands and joined the great migration into Georgia, Kentucky, and Illinois.  Four of Thomas' sons and over 30 of his grandchildren representing at least 10 of the families of his 11 children moved to what is now Madison County, Illinois. En route, a number of the families stopped off in Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee.

Why Illinois became the land of promise for the Gillhams rests upon a very dramatic story.  While living in Kentucky, James Gillham, a son of Thomas Gillham, Sr., and one of the first members of the family to move west, was subject to a raid from a tribe of Kickapoo Indians while living in Illinois.  While seeking out and ransoming his family, James saw the Illinois country and was attracted to it. He later settled there and encouraged brothers, relatives and friends to come also.

William and Jane emigrated to the Six Mile Prairie, east of St. Louis, after his brother James had recovered his family from the Indians.  William's brothers who also moved there were Isaac, John, and Thomas.  They settled in the American Bottom and all four brothers are buried in Wanda Cemetery, South Roxana, Madison County.  In 1824, the Convention (slavery) Party owed their defeat to a great extent to the Gillham family and their kinsmen in Illinois, who almost in a solid phalanx gave five hundred votes against slavery at the election that declared this a free state.

In 1823, William and his family located in Lofton's Prairie, Jersey County.  William was the father-in-law of John G. Lofton who married Agnes, and John McDow, who married Margaret.  William died at the home of his son John Davidson Gillham on 27 October 1825 and is buried in East Newbern Cemetery.

We owe our gratitude and respect to Thomas Gillham and his family who have established the foundation of America by their love of freedom, fighting prowess, pioneer toughness, and family fortitude.  We mark and dedicate William Gillham's grave so that he is not forgotten and future generations will know his service to our country.


The grave of Revolutionary War patriot William Gordon McAdams
was marked by the Ninian Edwards DAR Chapter on October 4, 2009 at

the Dugger Cemetery in Highland, Ill with the GGRC as Color Guard
 (GPS coordinates for cemetery: Latitude: 38.7344918
Longitude: -89.7589822)

William McAdams
William Gordon McAdams (1760-1843)
Personal Information:
Born:  1760 in York Co., PA
Family:  Parents John McAdams and Sarah (Sloss) McAdams

In 1790 married Mary Hendricks in Sumner Co., TN. That union produced one boy and ten girls.

Death:  September 4, 1843 in Madison Co.

Military Record:  Private: North Carolina Continental troops. He enlisted in the spring of 1779 at Hawsfield, Orange Co., NC, and served three months in Captain John Carrington’s company, Colonel Martin Armstrong’s Regiment. He marched from Hillsboro, N.C. to Georgia and joined General Lincoln at Stono on the Savannah River where he was in battle. For two years from 1780 to 1782 in Captain William Douglass’ and Captain Nathaniel Christman’s company, Colonel William O’Neale’s Regiment. He was in a battle at Haw River where Tory Colonel Piles was defeated by Colonel Lee Henry ”Light Horse Harry” Lee. He applied for a pension after coming to Madison County.

Burial:  His actual gravesite is unknown. His children married Duggers and the Dugger Cemetery is located on his farm. He died at the home of Aaron Rule who married one of his daughters and Aaron’s farm adjoined the McAdam’s farm. His daughter Holly McAdams Dugger has gravestone there as does Aaron Rule.

Narrative:  In 1819 the McAdams settled on a land grant and were successful at farming. Like many Revolutionary soldiers he lived to the ripe old age of eighty-three. Sixty nine years later in 1912, Miss Nina Gaskins, a descendant of William McAdams, read “Grandmother’s Story of Bunker Hill” as a part of ceremonies commemorating Madison County’s Centennial Celebration  and the unveiling of a bronze tablet in the Madison County Courthouse honoring Revolutionary soldiers who lie buried in Madison County.   

Sources:
    Books
    History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison County, Oct 1912, pg         372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update         by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Census
    1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age
    Pension  S33083 (NC); Madison County, Illinois Pension Roll, August 22, 1833, age 74; Madison County Pension         Census, June 1, 1840, age 83 residing with Aaron Rule, head of family.

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this site is subject to                         verification.

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison         County Court House Lobby; placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912




The grave of
Revolutionary War patriot John Nix was marked
on October 11, 2008 at

the Nix-Judy Cemetery in Glen Carbon, Ill
(Near 157 & I-270 north towards SIU-E.  GPS coordinates for cemetery:  N38 degrees 45.555'; W090 degrees 00.464')
headstone
John Nix  (1756-1822)
Personal Information:
Born:  1756 in the Camden District of South Carolina

Family:  Son of Ambrose & Hannah Nix. He had a brother and six sisters.
Married Winifred _____?_____  in 1772 in South Carolina. They had seven sons and three daughters, all born in South Carolina.  
 
Death:  July 12, 1822 in Madison Co., IL

Military Record: John enlisted in 1782 and served with several units of the South Carolina Continental State Troops. His initial assignment was with Captain Davis’company of Richard Win’s Regiment. He is also recorded as serving under Capt. Thomas Baker. He was in the battles of Orangebury the 10th and 11th of May and the battle of Eutaw Springs the 8th of September 1781.

Burial: Nix-Judy Cemetery where his wife is also buried. 

Narrative:  After the war, it is probable that John retired from farming. He married a woman named Winifred and they had a total of 7 sons and 3 daughters all born in SC. As was common in the times, John and his family migrated westward to take advantage of the virgin, fertile lands in Illinois Territory. His brother Temple came to Madison County but did not remain, migrating instead to Louisiana. A sister and husband settled in Green County, Il.

Upon arriving in Illinois in 112, he settled on land identified as Section 32 by the land office of Kaskaskia, IL. His formal claim in 1813 was witnessed by Josiah Randle. In 1817 he received an Official patent to the land from     President James Monroe, just prior to Illinois admission into the United States in 1818. The land is southwest of Edwardsville at the foot of Nearby Sunset Hills bluff.

John and his family were prosperous farmers of the area until his death in 1822. Upon John’s death the value of his estate was listed at $1221 and included farm implements, numerous heads of livestock, horses, and hogs.

Sources:
    Books
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
   
    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Additional Sources
    Madison County Genealogical Society News Letter, V.10, #4, April 1989
    NIX South Carolina Illinois Pennsylvania by Betty Buntin Matthews, Shelbyville, KY, 1999

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to verification.
    

The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Thomas Tindall
was marked on October 27, 2007 at

the Lusk Cemetery in Edwardsville, Ill.
(GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 48.705; W 089 degrees 57.763')
thomas tindall
Thomas Tindall (d. 1832)

Personal Information:
Born:  abt. 1767 in Halifax County, VA

Family: He married Martha Wall in Virginia. They had two children born to them in Virginia, four in North Carolina, and three in Christian Co., Kentucky. 

Death: 1832 in Madison Co., IL

Military Record: As boy he helped feed the army.

Burial:  Lusk Memorial Park, Randle & Oak in Edwardsville. 

Narrative:  Thomas Tindall brought his family west after the war. As they traveled through the Illinois Territory toward their destination which was Boon’s Lick, MO, they stopped to have lunch on a cold November day in 1816 about where the Madison County Courthouse stands today. After they ate, the teams were hitched and the traveling party proceeded toward Alton where they planned to cross the river into MO. As they passed through   Edwardsville, Edward Fountain, an innkeeper, recognized Tindall. They had been school mates in VA. Fountain persuaded the group to stop for a few days. Tindall went into camp with his family where the Wabash train station stands today, but soon moved his family into a log courthouse where the family wintered. The recently built county courthouse had no floor or chimney. A fire was built in one corner of the room on a dirt floor and the smoke escaped through a hole in the roof. When the second Monday in March, 1817 arrived, Tindall and his family had to move out of the courthouse. The court was once again in session. Tindall built a log house     nearby and lived there until his death.

Sources :
    Books
    History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks, page 538-9
    Madison County Illinois an Alphabetical Listing of Obituaries, 1820-1980 compiled by MCGS and Barbara Hitch             (Tindall)
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer
    Edwardsville Democrat, March 14, 1885, Our Dead Soldiers, (Thomas Tindall)

    Census
    1818 State Census, Madison County
    1820 Madison County Federal Census


The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Henry Thornhill
was marked on October 7, 2006 at

the Nix-Judy Cemetery in Glen Carbon, Ill.
(Near 157 & I-270 north towards SIU-E.  GPS coordinates for cemetery:  N38 degrees 45.555'; W090 degrees 00.464')
Henry Thornhill grave
Henry Thornhill  (1757-1833)
Personal Information:
Born:  September 1757 in Rockingham Co., VA
Family: Son of Samuel Thornhill and Mary Clyburn
He married Lettia or Letty ___?___ bef. 1787 in Rockingham Co., VA
Death:  1833 in Madison Co., IL

Military Record: Private: Virginia Continental troops. He enlisted in Rockingham Co., VA in Capt. Robert Craven’s company and served six months, The soldiers marched against Indians to the Tigers Valley then to the West Fork  of the Monongahela River below Red Stone. He then enlisted in Capt. Daniel Ragan’s Tenth Virginia Regiment for three months. He was involved in no battles. The unit marched in close pursuit of Indians for two days to West  Fork country but did not overtake the Indians. He also marched from Williamsburg to Yorktown and was present at the siege of Yorktown within five days before the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. He was discharged at     Yorktown.

Burial:  Probably Goshen Cemetery.

Narrative: Henry moved to Randolph Co., IL in 1821. In 1825 he relocated to Madison Co., IL. He was living with Ryland Ballard on the 1830 Census of Madison Co..

    Sources:
    Books
    History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
    Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912,                 page 372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update         by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Census
    1830 Madison County Federal Census

    Pension  S32557VA
    V file Madison County Archival Library
    See Additional History compiled by Marilyn Campbell  - Madison County     Archival Library

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this site is subject to                            verification.

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison         County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912


The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Josias Wright
was marked on October 8, 2005 at

the Nix-Judy Cemetery in Glen Carbon, Ill.
(Near 157 & I-270 north towards SIU-E.  GPS coordinates for cemetery:  N38 degrees 45.555'; W090 degrees 00.464')
headstone
Josias (Josiah) Wright (1747-1825)

Personal Information:
Born:  January 18, 1746 in Brunswick Co., VA
Family: He married Apphia Randle in 1778 in Virginia.
Death:  January 2, 1825 in Madison Co., IL

Military Record:  Josias served as a officer from Montgomery Co., NC.   Montgomery Co. was formed from Anson Co., NC in1779.

Burial:  Unknown  - Possible locations are Goshen and the old Bethel Cemetery were on the site where Lakewood Subdivision in Glen Carbon is located or Bethel Cemetery, Ebenezer Cemetery, or the Wright Burial ground on the Shaffer farm on the St. Louis Wagon Road.

Narrative:  In 1779 Josias moved his family to Warren Co., GA. On September 3,1811 the family started for Illinois accompanied by the families of Josias Randle, Thomas Randle, and Jesse Bell. They arrived at Turkey Hill the 17th of October. Josias bought the Shaffer farm, about two and a half miles southwest of Edwardsville. He remained there until his death on January 2,1825. His death notice is found in the Spectator January 4, 1825.

Josias had been a Methodist preacher in NC. The Bethel Methodist Church was built in 1805, 2 miles south of Edwardsville in the Goshen district. The second Methodist Conference was held there in 1817. The church was     in such bad condition with a leaky roof that the meeting was adjourned to the home of Rev. Wright where the entire conference, bishop, and 14 preachers ate their meals as the guests of Rev. Wright and transacted their business in his house. Josias’ son John Wesley Wright reminisces in 1875 “Churches were few when we came here there was an old log church called Bethel, west of Bizer place. In 1817 the Methodist Annual Conference was held at my father’s house and in my room."

Josias Wright’s house was located about half-way between Bethel and Ebenezer, the second Methodist Church in Edwardsville. It stood across the St. Louis road from the Center Grove School which was also used as a     church. The house was torn down sometime after 1904.

Sources :
    Books
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Stalker  Vol 11, Summer 1991, No.3
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Alton EveningTelegraph, Thursday, May 13, 1875, “Talks with Early Settlers"
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74
    Spectator, January 4, 1825

    Additional Sources
    Pruit, “Abstracts of Montgomery Co. 1778-1795
    McDee, Anson Co., NC, Abstracts of Early Record, page 136
    Revolutionary Army Accounts, Cert No 1953
    John W, Wright, ESQ-Reminisces of the Early History of Madison County
    The Bethel Meeting House in The Land of Goshen by Marie T. Eberle
    The American Illustrated Methodist Magazine, August, 1900



The graves of Revolutionary War patriots Richard Randle and Isham Randle
were marked on October 9, 2004 at

the Nix-Judy Cemetery in Glen Carbon, Ill.
(Near 157 & I-270 north towards SIU-E.  GPS coordinates for cemetery:  N38 degrees 45.555'; W090 degrees 00.464')
headstoneheadstone
Isham Randle (1758-1838)

Personal Information:
Born:  March 23, 1758 in Brunswick Co., Va.
Family  Son of Josias Randle and Jane Proctor Isham was one of five siblings, Richard , Alphia, Josiah, and Osborne. He married Frances Jackson and had eight children born in Virginia and North Carolina.
Death: Aft. April 18, 1838 in Madison Co., IL

Military Record:  He enlisted in the Montgomery Co., North Carolina in 1780 for three months and was a private. He was under Capt. Abner Crump, Col. Dowy Leadbetter. He was in The North Carolina Continental Army. He later enlisted in Brunswick Co., VA for four months under Capt. Edmund Wilkins. He applied for a pension while a resident of Goshen in Madison County.

Burial: Speculation – It is stated that he was buried in the Goshen or Old Bethel Cemetery which was located where the present-day Lakewood Subdivision exists today. Stones located at the Nix-Judy (Pioneer) Cemetery are commemorative resting places.

Narrative:  Isham arrived in Madison County in 1817.

Sources:
    Books
        History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison County, Oct 1912,             page 372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle
   
    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74

    Pension  S31313NC/VA

    Other
    See additional sources compiled by Marilyn Campbell of the Madison County Archival Library.

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to verification.

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison     County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912.

Richard Randle (1752-1841)

Personal Information:
Born: August 21, 1752 in Brunswick Co., VA
Family: Son of Josias Randle and Jane Proctor Isham was one of five siblings, Richard , Alphia, Josiah, and Osborne. He married Polly Rufty in 1772 in VA. They had three boys and two girls. 
Death:  April 15, 1842 in Madison Co., IL.

Military Record: He  enlisted in Brunswick Co., VA in 1777 for six weeks with Capt. John Macklin, Col. Charles Harrison, VA line of troops; again enlisted August, 1780 for nine months with Capts. James Allen and West Harris in the NC troops. He was pensioned.

Burial: Speculation – The tract of land obtained by Richard from the government had located on it a site known as Randle or Greencastle Cemetery, later known as Harris Cemetery. It is speculated that he may be buried there.

Speculation – It is stated that he was buried in the Goshen or Old Bethel Cemetery which was located where the present-day Lakewood Subdivision exists today. Stones located at the Nix-Judy (Pioneer) Cemetery are     commemorative resting places.

Sources:
    Books
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912, page         372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74

    Census
    1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age

    Pension  S32464NC/VA

    Other
    See additional sources compiled by Marilyn Campbell of the Madison County Archival Library.

    Internet
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to verification.

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison         County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912



The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Daniel Brown
was marked on November 1, 2003 at

the Wanda Cemetery in South Roxana, Ill.
(GPS Coordinates: N 38 degrees 49.298'; W 090 degrees 03.465')
daniel brown

Daniel Brown (1757-1833)

Personal Information:
Born:  Oct 1757 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Family:  Married Elizabeth ____?______
Death:  After October 1833

Military Record:  He enlisted in Augusta County, Virginia August 8, 1776, under Capt. John Gilmore, Cols. William Russell and William Christian Gadliff – again for six weeks under Capt. John Martin – in 1782 he made sergeant    under Capt. McBride and Col. Trigg – he served from March 20 until May 29 – again served the month of October 1782 under Capt. Samuel     Kirkham and Col. Benjamin Logan – in 1782 the Lincoln County Kentucky (formerly Kentucky Co., VA) militia was called out to suppress Indian raids in the area of the Falls of the Ohio. General Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files, Vol. 1 states Daniel Brown lived on the Dicks River near present day Danville. Daniel Brown showed his patriotism by re-enlisting after the war in 1786. It is noted that General George Rogers Clark was in command of the military units during the time of Daniel Brown’s enlistment in 1782 and 1786.

Burial:  Wanda Cemetery in South Roxana, IL. 

Narrative: Brown eventually located in Madison Co., IL where he applied for and received a pension in 1833.

Sources:
    Books
        History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Patriots Buried In Madison County,                     Illinois, update by Marie T. Eberle

    Pension  S32132 (VA) He was pensioned and his widow , Elizabeth, received a pension.
    Illinois Pension Roll, Madison Co., Oct 14, 1833, age 75. Elizabeth W5907 (VA)


    Other  See information compiled by Marilyn Campbell – Madison Co. Museum

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison         County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912


The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Lt. Jabez Turner
was marked on September 17, 2000 at

the Godfrey Cemetery in Godfrey, Ill.
(Off Rt 67.  GPS coordinates:  N 38 degrees 57.409'; W 090 degrees 11.497')
Jabez Turner jabez turner2

Jabez Turner (1756-1846)

Personal Information:
Born:  January 31, 1756 in Bristol, PA
Family: Son of Abraham and Rebecca Turner. He was the eldest of 11 children.
He married Rebecca Wolcott October 29, 1778 at the Second Church of Christ, New Haven, New Haven, CT. Seven children were born to this union.
Death:  December 12, 1840 in Godfrey Tp. Madison Co., IL

Military Record: He enlisted at New Haven in May of 1775. He served in the CTLine engaging in the expedition to St. Johns and Montreal when his regiment retreated from Long Island during the British threat to New York. He was discharged at Montreal but received no written papers.

Burial:  Godfrey Cemetery. 

Narrative:  In 1795 the family moved to Great Barrington, Mass. Sometime before 1838, Jabez and Rebecca moved to Godfrey to live with their son, Timothy. Living in the home were 10 students who attended Monticello Seminary. Tim was the Postmaster of Godfrey. Jabez was one of the original founders of the Community Congregational Church and the Godfrey Cemetery.
 
Sources:
    Books
        Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912,
        page 372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Pension  S31440CT

    Paper
    Jabez Turner, Revolutionary Soldier by Marie T. Eberle

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to verification.

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison         County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912



The grave of Revolutionary War patriot General Reuben Hopkins
was marked on June 27, 1999 at

the Lusk Memorial Cemetery, Edwardsville, Ill.
(GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 48.705; W 089 degrees 57.763')
reuben hopkins
Reuben Hopkins  (1748-1822)

Personal Information:
Born:  June 1, 1747 at Amelia, Dutchess co., NY.
Family:  Son of Stephen Hopkins & Jemimah Bronson
Married to Hannah Elliot of CT. on November 23, 1773
Death:  August 16, 1822 at Edwardsville, IL

Military Record:  His firm beliefs in the rights of man and the independence of America moved him to join the NY militia in October of 1775 serving as adjutant and as Secretary of the General Committee. With the start of the     American Revolution he left his law practice and joined the army as 1st Lt. and rose to Captain serving as adjutant in Col. Morris Graham’s regiment under Brig. General Clinton. He served at the battle of Bunker Hill,     Peaksville, and White Plains.

Again he came to the service of his country during the War of 1812. This time he was commissioned Brig. General of the Fifth Brigade of New York.

Burial:  Lusk Memorial Park, Randle & Oak , Edwardsville, IL 

Narrative:  He spent his whole life in active service to his country and living by his religious beliefs. He trained in and practiced law. At the end of the Revolution he returned to his law practice in Orange Co., NY where he     discharged his duties with honor and was recognized for his sound legal knowledge and discriminating judgment. His dedication to the citizens led him to accept the clerkship of the Circuit Court and later represented them     in both the Senate and Lower House, a many times elected official. This was a time of party mutations and discord. Rueben Hopkins was described as being praiseworthy of his patriotic zeal yet a humble Christian deserving tribute and respect. Following the War of 1812 he moved to Edwardsville,IL.

In 1819 on the anniversary of the Declaration of Independence everyone gathered at the “Sign of George Washington” a hotel across from the first log courthouse. Every year on the Fourth of July it was a tradition to have General Hopkins read the Declaration of Independence. Following the reading there were 21 toasts including one to “The Town of Edwardsville- more wives and less bachelors: and may they all be celebrated for the discharge of their private duties, as they were now are for their patriotism.”  Everyone gave three cheers and drank to that.

Sources :
    Books
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note –Information from this site is subject to verification.


The grave of Revolutionary War patriot William Bates
was marked on June 28, 1998 at

the Lockhaven Country Club, Godfrey, Ill.
(Off the Great River Road, turn onto Lockhaven Rd.   Grave is located before entrance to the C.C. in front of pond.  GPS coordinates:  N 38 degrees 56.547'; W 090 degrees 17.599')
Wm Bates

As typical of many Americans during the Revolutionary War era, there exist differing accounts of William Bates's life.  However, the best than can be determined from existing records is that William was born of Pennsylvania Dutch extraction about 1757 and spoke German as his first language.  Though unable to read or write, he was able to make a living at various locations by owning farms.  He was small of stature and was aware of his shortcomings, desiring his heirs to be better educated than he was.

Much of what we know about Patriot Bates comes from his application for a military pension filed in April 1832.  In that application and subsequent revisions of it he states that during the early period of the Revolutionary War he served in the North Carolina Militia.  Once while guarding British prisoners at Salisbury "... some Tories determined to assassinate me and therefore I enlisted rather than return home."  Bates noted that he enlisted for the term of eighteen months in March or April 1781 in a North Carolina Company commanded by Captain Dixon under the command of General Greene, and that he served until December 1782 or January 1783 when he was discharged at Wilmington, N.C.

After the War he married Elizabeth Moore.  The Moore and Bates families were friends of Daniel Boone to whom credit is given for their 1802 migration from N.C. to Kentucky where they remained until 1808 when they began to follow Boone to Missouri.  Legend has it that malaria struck the family as they were ascending the Mississippi River.  Seeking a place to settle on high ground, they picked a site on Wood River Creek near where the Alton State Hospital now stands and where two of William's grandsons were victims of the 1814 Wood River Massacre.  About 1817 the family moved to the mouth of Piasa Creek on land that is now part of Lockhaven Country Club and built a log cabin.  It is thought that they were the first white settlers in that area of Madison County which became Greene County in 1821 and then Jersey County in 1839.

William died in February 1848 and is buried alongside three of his five wives near the original site of the Piasa Creek homestead.

 

The grave of Revolutionary War patriot William Biggs
was marked on June 29, 1997 at

Nix-Judy Cemetery, Glen Carbon, Ill.
(Near 157 & I-270 north towards SIU-E.  GPS coordinates for cemetery:  N38 degrees 45.555'; W090 degrees 00.464')
Wm Biggs headstone

William Biggs (1755-1827)

Personal Information:
Born:  June 3, 1755 at Monocacy Manor in Frederick Co., Maryland
Family:  Son of Benjamin & Henrietta Munday Biggs
Married Nancy Mundy
Death:  March 27, 1827 in Madison Co. at the residence of his brother-in-law, Samuel Judy

Military Record:  He was sworn into the Virginia Militia by Patrick Henry in 1777. He is known to have served as a Lt. under the command of George Rogers Clark in 1782 in the capture of Kaskaskia and Vincennes.

Burial:  Unknown 

Narrative: After the war and his marriage he returned to Virginia and farmed. In 1784 with his family and several of his former comrades returned to Illinois and settled near Bellefontaine in Monroe Co. In 1789 frontiersman Biggs was     captured by Kickapoo Indians whole on the road between Bellefontaine and Cahokia and taken 250 miles to an Indian village in northern Indiana. He ransomed his freedom using credit from a French trader. Bigg’s own account of his capture, captivity, and ransom notes – “… in the coustidy of savage I then made interest with a French trader that was in town for creadit and got goods and purchased myself from the savage my price was one hundred seven bucks or dollars then continued three weeks longer at the same town before an opportunity offered my jurney.” About ten weeks after his capture Biggs returned to his Bellefontaine home where he resumed farming and trapping. He served with Benjamin Logan in 1786. 

Although he served as a representative of the Illinois Territory after coming to this area following the war, he is best remembered for having dug a salt mine reported to have been 440 feet deep in 1832 near the bank of Silver Creek in Section 19 in Saline Tp., Madison Co. He invested a considerable sum of money in the project. He hired 20 men and used 15 cords of wood a day to keep 40 large kettles boiling for evaporation purposes. However all that work only produced 6 bushels of salt a day. This project caused all his money to evaporate into thin air. Today the well is in the bed of Silver Creek due to a change in the creek’s course over the many years. Biggs dug his well only 4 years before his death in 1827. 

William Biggs served as the first sheriff of St. Clair Co. from 1790 -1799. In 1808 he was elected Justice of Peace and Judge of Common Pleas. He was twice elected to represent the Illinois Territorial Legislature at Vincennes. In 1812 he was elected to represent St. Clair Co. in the Legislative Council.

Sources:
    Books
    George Rogers Clark and His Military Records, 1778-1784 compiled by Margery Heberling Harding, page 111
        (William Biggs payroll)
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Kaskaskia records 1778-1790 Collections of the Illinois State Historical Library Vol 5, Virginia Series, Vol 2, by             Clarence Walworth Alvord, 1909 page 421 ( William Biggs ) page 423                
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Pioneer History of Illinois, 1887 by John Reynolds page 338 (Seybold) pages 341-343 (Biggs)
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976
    History of St. Claire County, Illinois, 1881, by Brink, Mc Dounugh &  Co.

    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers and Patriots Buried In Madison County, Illinois,         update by Marie T. Eberle    

    Newspapers
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer    

    Census
    1818 State Census, Madison County
    1820 Madison County Federal Census

    Pension  R19369VA

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this site is subject to verification.

    Other
    The Madison County Historical Museum / Archival Library have biographical information about William Biggs in             information of  July 1997 by Genl George Rogers Clark Chapter of SAR.




The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Francis Roach
was marked on July 7, 1996 at

the Lutheran Cemetery, Worden, Ill.
(GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 55.019'; W 089 degrees 51.603')
francis roach

Francis Roach (1739-1845)

Personal Information:
Born:  April 1739 in Fairfax Co., VA
Family: He was married.
Death:  9 Jul 1845 at his son David’s house at Lamb’s Point (Worden)

Military Record:  He enlisted in 1779 and again in 1780 when he served with Capt.Dougherty on the frontier. He went with his captain in the service of his country under the command of General George Rogers Clark in 1782, and in 1786 he fought the Indians under the command of General     Benjamin Logan. During the campaigns into the Indian country in the present state of Ohio, in one he helped cut up and destroy their corn at “Old Chillicothe of the Little Miami”. Mr. Roach had drawn a pension of $24.67 a year since 1832 (he was 93 when he applied).

Burial:  Hamel Tp.      

Narrative:  Being an orphan boy, he was bound to a master, who removed with him to North Carolina in early life, where he married. In 1779 he emigrated to Kentucky, where he spent the first six years in a fort at Dougherty’s Station, near Danville in Mercer Co.; and after residing in several other parts of that state (he is on the 1799 tax list for Christian Co., KY – 299 acres), moved to Madison Co., Il living there till his death.

Francis was a man below the middling stature, of a swarthy complexion, gray eyes, and of active bodily faculties, which he retained to a remarkable degree till his last illness – was naturally of a cheerful disposition, rather weakly the first thirty-one years, which probably taught him how to be prudent in managing his health, having enjoyed, uniformly, (with the exception of two or three attacks of fever and ague) good health during that period. He was always an early riser – a day rarely dawned before he was out of bed – winter and summer.  

Mr. Roach was always a temperate man, using ardent spirits only in the shape of “morning bitters”, as was the custom of the day – ate meat generally at every meal – never liked or drank coffee, but tea occasionally for the last ten years, and totally disused ardent spirits for the same period. He became a professor of religion, and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church in the year 1787, in which he remained a devout member the balance of his life.

After he was 100 years old, his eyesight became so dim that he could with difficulty discern one person from another – being guided more by their voice than otherwise. He never had the benefit of an education, and consequently had not much need for spectacles.  

Mr. Roach was a hatter by trade, but most of his labor was spent on the farm, which never ceased as long as his eyesight served him. He was seen cutting corn stalks in the field with a hoe after he became a centenarian.

Sources :
    Books
    History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912, page             372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Alton Telegraph, August 2, 1845 (Francis Roach Article)
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Census
    1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age

    Pension  S32494NC

    V file = Madison County Archival Library

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison             County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                     Revolution on September 16, 1912
    
           The grave of Revolutionary War patriot John Rattan
was marked on July 9, 1995 at

Vaughn Cemetery, Wood River, Ill.
(Off SR111.  GPS coordinates:  N38 degrees 52.501'; W090 degrees 03.460')
John Rattan
John Rattan ( Rotten) (1747-1821)
Personal Information:
Born:  1747 in North Carolina
Family: He was the son of William Wroten. He married Mary Green (Greene) in October of 1775. They had four         boys and four girls.
Death:  He died October 11, 1821

Military Record: He was a soldier in the service of North Carolina.

Burial:  Vaughn Cemetery in Wood River – Off SR 111
    
Sources:
    Books
        Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
        Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle
    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note Information from this site is subject to verification.
    DAR Patriot Search



The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Martin Pruit/Pruitt
was marked in 1993 at

Pruitt Cemetery,  Bethalto, Ill.
(GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 53' 24"; W 090 degrees 1' 40.8")

Martin Pruitt (Preuitt) (1752-1844)


Personal Information:
Born:  July 15, 1752 in Bontorte, Fincastle, Virginia
Family:  Son of William and Mary Pruitt.   He was one of nine children.
Married Mary Woods in North Carolina in 1771
Death:  June 22, 1844 in Edwardsville

Military Record:  Martin enlisted in the fall of 1778 for two years under Capts. William Campbell and William Edminton. William Edminton made Col. In 1780 Martin served as a sergeant and a spy. 

Burial:  Pruitt Cemetery in Bethalto. The cemetery is now located on the St. Louis Regional Airport.  

Narrative:  Several of the family was killed by Cherokee Indians in Tennessee in 1806 and in that same year the family moved to Madison County, Illinois. They first settled on Sand Ridge prairie, about three miles east of Alton. Later they moved to a farm which is about one-half mile south of the present-day Zion Lutheran Church in Bethalto. Martin and his wife left ten children.

Martin settled on a farm in Foster Tp. In1806. Two of his sons, James and Abraham,  pursued and caught one of the Kickapoo Indians who killed Mrs.Reagan following the Wood River Massacre. When the Indian was cornered he tried to shoot one of the Pruitt boys, but his gun jammed just long enough for the other Pruitt boy to shoot the Indian. When the Indian’s shot pouch was removed from his dead body, Mrs. Reagan’s scalp was found inside. The gun is now on display at the Madison County Historical Museum in Edwardsville.

Sources:
    Books
    History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835, pages 341-343 (Biggs)
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

   
Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912, page             372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

   
Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,63,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Census:  1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age

    Pension  S32455VA

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this site is subject to verification.

    Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison County             Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American Revolution on         September 16, 1912


The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Michael Deck
was marked in 1992 at

Deck Cemetery, Marine Ill.
(Located near Rt 143 & I-70, cemetery GPS coordinates N38 degrees 46.364'; W089 degrees 44.019')

michael deck

Michael Deck  (1759-1843)

Personal Information:
Born:  Feb, 6, 1759 in Rockingham, VA
Family: Son of John and Catarina Barbara Froelick Deck
Married Susannah Monger April 25, 1790 in Rockingham, VA and they had 13 children, seven boys and six girls
Death:  April 3, 1843 in Madison Co.

Military Record:  Michael enlisted May 5, 1778 under Capt. Robert Craven. He again enlisted in 1781 under Capt. Michael Coker. He was in the battle of Yorktown.

Burial:  Deck Cemetery, Grantfork, IL. 

Narrative:  The Deck family left Virginia for Illinois in 1828. His widow was allowed his pension.

Sources :
    Books
    History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976
    Illinois History, V29, #7, April 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912, page             372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Patriots Buried In Madison County, Illinois,             update by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer
   
    Census:  1840 Madison County Federal census, pensioner, states age

    Pension w22933

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this site is subject to verification.
   
    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison             County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912


The grave of Revolutionary War patriot Gaius Paddock
was marked in 1991 at

Paddock Cemetery, Bethalto,  Ill.
(Off Rt 159.  GPS coordinates: N 38 degrees 55.060'; W 089 degrees 58.174')
gaius paddock gaius and mary paddock

Gaius Paddock (1758-1831)

Personal Information:
Born:  Born November 22, 1757 in Middletown, Plymouth, Mass.
Family:  Son of Zachariah Paddock and Martha Washburn.  He married Mary Wood in February 1786. They had eight daughters.
Death:  August 11, 1831

Military Record:  He enlisted January 1, 1776 and was a member of Capt. Isaac Wood’s company, Col. William Larned’s regiment. He was with the troops that evacuated New York: was in the battle of Trenton and the skirmish at Frog Neck. He reenlisted for six weeks and was in the second battle of  Trenton and of Princeton: was in several skirmishes. In 1779 and 1780 he served under Lt. Joseph Bates, Col.Gamaliel Bradford’s regiment, Mass. Line of troops. One resource places him with George Washington at Valley Forge.

Burial:  Paddock Cemetery  -  East of Bethalto, IL and west of Holiday Shores, part of the NW of Section 3, T 5 N, R 8 W, Fort Russell Tp., Madison Co., IL.  Located about 150 yards east of State Rt. 159 and mile south of Moro Rd.     

Narrative:  After the war General Lafayette stopped in St. Louis on his tour of the United States. He was greeted by Gaius Paddock who was accompanied by his wife and eight daughters. The Paddock family shared in the festivities     that attended the visit by Lafayette, including a ball held in his honor. For many years after that event, a gold medallion of the Marquis de Lafayette, a souvenir of his visit to St. Louis, was kept on the white mantel in the living room of the Paddock home.


The Paddock Cemetery is on part of the 160 acres granted to Paddock by the government for his service in the Revolutionary War. Paddock arrived here in 1817 from Vermont to claim his acreage which became known as     “Paddock Wood”.

Sources:
    Books
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912, page             372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74
    News Democrat, Jan 20, 1982, Revolutionary Soldiers Are Buried In Madison County, by Pauline Meyer

    Pension  w26850MA

    Internet 
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this site is subject to verification.

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison             County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912




The grave of Revolutionary War patriot William Collins
was marked on October 7, 1990 at

Glenwood Cemetery, Collinsville,  Ill.
(GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 40.028'; W 089 degrees 59.095)
Wm Collins
william collins

William Collins (1760-1849)
Personal Information:
Born:  October 9, 1760 in Conn.
Family:  Son of William & Ruth Cook Collins
He married Esther Morris of Morris Point near New Haven on February 10, 1783 and they had three girls and seven boys.
Death:  1849

Military Record:  He enlisted at seventeen in April or May 1777 at Guilford Conn. He was a private in Col. Jonathan Meigs Conn. Regiment, under Capts.Humphrey Barker, Mansfield, and Potter. He served eight months in the battles of Valentine’s Hill and Delong’s Hill. In 1779 he served as a waiter for his uncle, Major Augustus Collins under Brigadier General Ward and was stationed at Stratford, near New Haven. He applied for a pension on April 12, 1840.

Burial: Glenwood Cemetery in Collinsville in the Collins plot. His stone is the tallest and at it’s foot is a DAR plaque mounted on a six inch square of concrete.  The Collins Plot is just inside the main entrance to the left. 

Narrative:  William and Esther settled in Litchfield, Conn. In 1783. He was a deacon in the church at Litchfield while Lyman Beecher was pastor. Their move to Illinois occurred in 1822. When William disposed of his property in     Connecticut for the trip to Illinois he was worth $4500. The City of Collinsville is said to have been named after the Collins brothers, William’s sons.

William is remembered as having hands that were knotted and gnarled by hard work, bald, with a thin fringe of white hair extending from temple to temple, blue-grey eyes, and a fair complexion. He used tobacco but never smoked. He had a quick and intense temper, during which times his favorite expletive was “tarnation”. He turned his soldiers pension over to the Presbyterian Church. He is known to have subscribed the first $500 to establish Illinois College.

Sources :
    Books
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976
   
    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Patriots Buried In Madison County, Illinois,             update by Marie T. Eberle

    Pension  S32184

    Internet 
    DAR Patriot Search
    Roots web – The Collins Family Of Connecticut
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this source is subject to verification.

    Other 
    Glenwood Cemetery Plot Diagram – Glenwood Cemetery -Collinsville


The grave of Revolutionary War patriot John Gullick, Jr.,
was marked in 1988 at

Gullick Cemetery, near Highland, Ill.
(Located off Leroy Rd, GPS coordinates N 38 degrees 40.765'; W 089 degrees 37.130')
John Gullick

John Gullick, Jr. (abt.1750-1831)
Personal Information:
Born:  abt.1750 in Tyron Co., NC
Family:  Son of John Gullick Sr. and his wife Elizabeth.
He first married Rebecca Davidson in Lincoln Co., NC by 1775. John married a second time to Hannah Ramsey.
Death: March 15, 1832 in Madison Co., IL

Service Record:  Supplied sundries to the NC militia

Burial:  Gullick Cemetery 


Narrative:  John raised his family in that part of  North Carolina which became Lincoln Co. John and brother, Jonathon,  were patriots as was their father and gave valuable aid by supplying sundries to the militia.

Before the coming of the Swiss, it is claimed that the first white settlers to locate any place near the present site of Highland came from Kentucky and North Carolina in 1804 and settled in the southeast part of Helvetia Tp. It was about this time when the Gullicks with other old settlers arrived. Many of the old settlers are buried in the old section of this cemetery settled in what was known as Sugar Creek Neighborhood and attended the Sugar Creek Presbyterian     Church. They all settled south and east of Highland. They did not at first buy land, but they “squatted” at any place     that suited them. A dozen years later after Illinois became a state, many had secured title to the same tracts on which they “squatted” and made improvements. Unscrupulous land dealers knew of these conditions and took advantage of the situation. They would purchase from the government, for $1.25 an acre, a quarter of a half section on which they knew were improvements had been made and then force the settlers who had made the improvements either to pay them $4 or $5 per acre, or give up the possession. Rather than lose all the improvements they had made, the settlers in many instances complied with the demands of the land dealers. About a quarter of a mile from the present site of the cemetery, in plain view, a choice location for a farm, the Pioneer Homestead of John Gullick, Jr. lies.   

Sources:
    Books
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976
    Sons of Adam History of the McAdams Families page 103 (Article on Joseph McAdams)
    Troy Area History and Families compiled by Troy Historical Society, 2003, page 167 (listing on Benjamin Hagler)

    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle
    Stalker Vol. 8, #4, 1988, page 151

   
Newspapers
    Highland News Leader, Wednesday, August 17, 1988, (9B)
    Edwardsville Journal, August 3, 1988
    Highland News Leader, Wednesday, June 15, 1988   

    V file at the Madison County Archival Library
   
    F file at the Madison County Archival Library




The graves of Revolutionary War patriot John Gillham and his brothers, Isaac, James and Thomas
were marked on August 2, 1987
at Wanda Cemetery,
South Roxana, Ill.
(GPS Coordinates: N 38 degrees 49.298'; W 090 degrees 03.465')
isaac gillham john gillham
james gillham thomas gillham

John and Sarah Gillham

James Gillham (1752-1813)

Personal Information:
Born: abt. 1752 in Virginia
Family:  Son of Thomas and Margaret “Peggy” Gay Campbell Gillham
He married Ann Barnett abt. 1776 in North Carolina
Death:  1834

Military Record:  He enlisted in South Carolina serving acceptably always. He served under Capt. Barnett, brother to his wife, Ann.

John Gillham,  (1756-1834)


Personal Information:
Born:  January 4, 1756 in Virginia
Family: :  Son of Thomas and Margaret “Peggy” Gay Campbell Gillham
Married Sarah Clark abt. 1776 in Pendleton, Pickens,  South Carolina
Death:  1834

Military Record:  John served in the 6th SC Regiment as corporal. He enlisted March 23, 1776 and was discharged in June 1777. He was also in the militia under Col. Brandon.

Thomas Gillham, Jr. (1740-1828)

Personal Information:
Born:  May 17, 1749 in Virginia
Family:  Son of Thomas and Margaret “Peggy” Gay Campbell Gillham
He married Susannah McDow abt. 1770 in Virginia and they had four boys and five girls. He later married Susannah Rutherford abt. 1795 in Virginia.
Death:  1828

Military Record:  Thomas served 210 days in Capt. Barnett’s company, Hill’s Regiment, and 14 days in Capt. Thompson’s company, Bratton’s Regiment, and 40 days in the same company under Lt. Dervin. For his     service he was paid by the State Treasurer.
Isaac Gillham (1757-1845)

Personal Information:
Born:  November 10,1757 in Augusta Co., VA
Family: Son of Thomas Gillham and wife
He married Jane Kirkpatrick in 1784 in VA and they had seven boys and one girl.
Death:  1845

Military Record:  He enlisted in Camden district December 17, 1777 for fifty days under Capt. Macupfee and Col. Neel – enlisted again March 29, 1778 under Lt. Thos Gillham when he was wounded – served again from May, 1780 under Capt. Barnett and Col. Neel – again enlisting February 15, 1781 – and again serving as a scout during the winter and spring of 1781 and 1782 with Capt. Barnett and Major Hartshorn. Issac was engaged in the battles of Rocky Mount and Fishing Creek. He came early to Madison County where his claim for a pension was allowed.

Burial:  Brothers Isaac, James, and Thomas Jr. were buried in family burial plots on their farms. Only John was initially buried in the Wanda Cemetery. (Thomas and James died prior to the establishment of the cemetery.) DAR memorial plaques have been installed within Section One of this cemetery for all four of these Revolutionary veterans; whether remains (or partial remains) were reinterred in the Wanda Cemetery from their original farm burial sites is a questionable possibility. Each of these four Revolutionary War veterans are memorialized by being sited within the tubular listing    coded “REV”. 

Narrative:  The Gillham Family – Seldom do we read of such a remarkable family, a family record for the enthusiastic patriotic service as the war record of the Gillham family. Thomas Gillham came to America from Ireland in 1730,    settling first in Virginia and then moved to Pendleton, South Carolina. He early espoused the cause of the colonies and with his seven sons and two sons-in-law served in the Revolutionary War. Five of those sons came to Madison County, Illinois to reside, but William later moved to Jersey County, Illinois. Only two of the four applied for a pension.

Sources :
    Books
    History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Pension Roll of 1835 in Four Volumes, published 1835
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976
    Centennial History of Madison County, Illinois

    Periodicals
    Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Revolutionary Heroes Honored In Madison Count, Oct 1912, page             372-381)
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Patriots Buried In Madison County, Illinois,             update by Marie T. Eberle

    Newspapers
    Edwardsville Intelligencer, Madison County Centennial Edition, Third Collinsville Section, page 3 (51), 60,73,74

    Pension  S32270NC

    Internet  
    Family Search – The Church of the Latter Day Saints (Note – Information from this site is subject to verification.

    Bronze Tablet Honoring Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois – Located in the Madison             County Court House Lobby; Placed By the Ninian Edwards Chapter of Alton - Daughters of the American                 Revolution on September 16, 1912





The grave of Revolutionary War patriot George Prickett
was marked on August 3, 1986

at Woodlawn Cemetery, Edwardsville, Ill.
(GPS Coordinates:  N 38 degrees 48.615'; W 089 degrees 58.555')
george prickett george prickett

George Prickett  (1757-1846)

Personal Information:
Born:  In Maryland in 1757.
Family:  Married Sarah Anderson
Death:  July 20, 1846 in Madison County

Military Record:  He was a private in the service of Virginia

Burial: He was originally buried in Lusk Cemetery but was removed to Woodlawn Cemetery when Lusk Cemetery became Lusk Memorial Park. 

Narrative:  George Prickett was a native of Maryland. He removed to one of the Carolinas, and from there to Georgia, then to Kentucky, and in 1808 came to Madison County, Illinois where he died . “County History”

Sources :
    Books
    Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1917
    Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
    Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried In Illinois, by the Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1976
    History of Madison County, 1882 by Brinks

    Periodicals
    Stalker Vol 13, No 1, page 27 Spring 1993, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Madison County, Illinois, update by         Marie T. Eberle

    Internet:  DAR Patriot Search



The Genl George Rogers Clark Chapter extends its sincere and heartfelt thanks to Marilyn Campbell and Linda Rosenthal for their hard work and dedication in researching and documenting the service of these patriots.

 
2008-12 Genl George Rogers Clark Chapter, ILSAR